Don’t Allow the Edges to Blur

I was asked by one of my favorite people the other day what I saw at our property and in the Golf Industry and what we were doing about it at TPC Tampa Bay?  I told him one of my favorite quotes was by Michael Johnson, the Olympic Gold Medalist Sprinter, “Discipline is not allowing the edges to blur.”  This is how he became the fastest man in the world for a period of time, but I happen to spend time around both the Game and Business of Golf and I think that concept applies to both of these environments.  I and the generations that came before me are fortunate that we have been able to see the greatest golfer of all time, Jack Nicklaus.  I also have been a part of the golf industry as arguably the most influential golfer of all time, Tiger Woods climb to the pinnacle of his game.  As most of us watched Tiger with his comeback, we were excited at the concepts that brings for the game of golf.  As I watched him play, the edges looked blurry to me.  Chip shots were just a bit off, putting wasn’t up to his standards, approach shots that would typically be 5 feet away ended up missing the green.  It was great to see him on the golf course again and play pain free, but to ascend to the summit of the game he will have to tighten up the edges of his game.  As golfers, we all have our sweet spots that we are good at, but we have to be able to focus on the edges if we are going to be great in golf and I’ve found this approach should carry over to whatever business we are in.  Industries used to have a bit of a “Baseball” model, where you were either a pitcher, 1st baseman or catcher for example, where the current business environment is much more of a “Golf” or “Basketball” approach.  We all have to be able, even competent, in each of the disciplines our industries require.  Just because you are a guard in basketball, you better get in there and be willing to rebound or play defense a center must be able to dribble!  I think about the great artists, Van Gogh, Rembrandt, DaVinci they had to paint to the edge of the canvas, it wasn’t just about Mona Lisa’s smile, the way that light cascades into The Night Watch, or the morning star in The Starry Night.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s